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When the temperature begins to drop I find myself craving more salty and warm foods. 
 
As I was driving home today from a wonderful rejuvenating massage 'miso soup' sprang into my mind. 
 
It fit the bill as miso is a super clean food full of important nutrients. 
 
Miso is made out of fermented soy . This is key as soy beans are one of the hardest for the human system to digest.
 
The fermentation process serves as a pre-digestion making it easier to assimilate nutrients sans digestive hell that some experience with tofu. 
 
Miso is also high in zinc, manganese two important antioxidants, helps repopulate friendly digestive flora, and is high in vitamin K important for bone health. 
 
So how to make a tasty Miso Soup? 
  • Choose the type of miso you like most (red is more potent, yellow and white are less intense)
  • Bring about 4 cups of water to a boil 
  • Slice 2 cups of crimini or any other mushrooms
  • Slice 3 carrots into full moon circles 
  • Dice one green onion (or more if you love them)
  • Cut up 4 baby bok choy's (or 1 large bok choy)
  • Once the water is near boiling drop the carrots in let cook for 3 minutes then add mushrooms, let cook 3 more minutes. 
  • Turn down to a simmer and drop in green onion and bokchoy cook for 3 more minutes. 
  • Turn heat off. 
  • If you like your veggies more cooked let them sit longer if you like a soft crunch move to the next step.
  • Scoop soup into large bowls. 
  • SUPER IMPORTANT, in order to preserve the fermented health benefits of miso it is vital not to place miso paste in boiling soup water.
  • Allow the soup to cool down for 2-3 minutes before adding 1tbsp of miso paste into each large bowl
  • Dissolve the paste by stirring thoroughly.

Miso sometimes gets a bad rap for having too much sodium. Although it is important to be mindful the sodium content in miso does not inflict the same consequences as processed low quality table salt. 

 
Enjoy the life giving benefits and nourishing qualities of simple miso.

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